Wednesday, October 17, 2012

Sunset and Moonrise on the Harbor

As the sun sets on Five Islands,

Moonlight silvers the harbor,

And colors seep like paint on canvas.

I float in the moment, content.

Blog Watch: congratulations to Pamela@From the House of Edward on the publication of a book of essays from her blog! After a year offline to move house twice(!), Alyson is back at a new blog address: New England Living.

Earth Watch: we had an earthquake last night during dinner! It was only 4.5 magnitude, but since we were about 50 miles from the epicenter, our house rumbled and shook. I had no idea an earthquake could be as loud as thunder. Rather unusual in Maine!

16 comments:

tina said...

Beautiful.

kacky said...

An earthquake in Maine? I didn't know you had them there! Learn something new every day!! The photos are beautiful!!!

A Cuban In London said...

A few things that I loved about this post.

You were able to capture that full moon the other night. Lucky you! :-) I loved, loved that photo.

First time I see the word "silver" used as a verb and... I'm nicking it. I'll give you the credit, of course! :-)

There's poetry exuding from every single pore of your post. Both text and images. Many thanks.

Greetings from London.

Cat said...

Because of your soulful photos and words, I'm floating with you ♥

Alyson (New England Living) said...

What a beautiful and peaceful post. After spending a week on the Maine coast this summer, I grew to love those pink sunsets on the water. There is no feeling like witnessing one of those.

troutbirder said...

You chose exactly the right words to go with the pictures.... Perfect actually.

Les said...

We had an earthquake here last year. It was so unexpected I remember immediately thinking "this can't be an earthquake". I am glad it was just a shake-up for you.

Petra said...

The pink air looks wonderful but most of all I like that reflection in the second picture from the top, Sarah.

It must have been weird to feel your house rumble and shake, were you afraid of what might come next?

Rose said...

Beautiful photos! At first glance I thought the first one was a painting.

I've experienced two earthquakes, and it certainly can be rather frightening--I remember wondering what was happening at first, because you don't expect something like that.

Donna said...

That is so pretty. I aspire to write poetry to match my photos the way that you do. Although mine will never be as good as yours!
I heard about the earthquake--I can't believe that happened! Crazy!

Carol said...

Stunning photography and words Sarah! I only just heard about the earthquake yesterday at my figure drawing group! That must have been a bit unsettling. Thanks for the link to Pamela's blog.

Sarah Laurence said...

All, thanks for your praise about the photo poetry and your concern about the earthquake. At the time I was puzzled, not scared. At first I thought it was a passing truck or roadwork. My son correctly identified it as an earthquake. It only lasted a few seconds, but none of us thought to go under the table or stand in the doorframe until after it was over. I found it rather exciting like a thunderstorm, but of course had it been a big earthquake that caused damage it would have been terrifying. I feel for my friends in California and Japan. Sorry to be so slow to reply and blog visit. It’s a busy week.

☆sapphire said...

Everything in this post is so beautiful!! I didn't know that "silver" can be a verb. I felt relieved to know that you were safe in the earthquake. In this country, the earth frequently shakes and trembles(sigh).

Sarah Laurence said...

Oh dear, Sapphire, I fear I'm ruining your perfect English. Silver is not supposed to be a verb, but I've taken "poetic license." I tire of overused verbs like shine and reflect for moonlight so invented my own. I feel a bit sheepish (that is proper use!) for going on about our tiny earthquake when Japan suffers through some awful ones, and you had a close call with a real one yourself.

Amanda said...

sarah, you have done something i perennially find myself unable to do - capture the moon prominently in a photograph! this image is truly a lovely composition. if you are comfortable in sharing, i would love to know what camera you use.

Sarah Laurence said...

Amanda, thank you! I find the best time to capture the moon is at sunrise or sunset as you don't need a tripod but there isn't so much light that the moon is washed out. I have 2 cameras: a Nikon D80 DSLR and Canon Power Shot SX200 IS, which is a point and shoot favored by professional photographers. I used the Canon for these sunset shots as it is especially good on the sunset setting and since it's less bulky and heavy, it's often the camera in my bag. The Baxter and Monhegan photos over the summer were shot by my Nikon DSLR, which allows me to shoot RAW and do more editing in Lightroom Photoshop. If you are serious about photography, you need good photo editing software and an external drive to store the large images. Before switching to digital I did darkroom photography.